DexamethasoneDexamethasone

Dexamethasone Implant

What is this medicine?

DEXAMETHASONE (dex a METH a sone) is a corticosteroid. The implant is used to treat macular edema. This is a condition where fluid collects in the eye causing swelling. It is also used to treat swelling in the eye that is not caused by an infection. The implant will only treat the eye that it has been placed into.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • any active infection

  • glaucoma

  • torn posterior lens capsule

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to dexamethasone, corticosteroids, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is placed in position by a surgical procedure. It is done by a trained surgeon in a hospital or clinic setting.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you've taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

This does not apply.

What may interact with this medicine?

Interactions are not expected. Do not use any other eye products without asking your doctor or health care professional.

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular check ups. Have your eyes checked as directed. If your eyes become red, sensitive to light, or you develop eye pain or changes in vision, you should contact your eye doctor right away.

After the implant is placed in your eye, your vision may be blurry. This change should be for only a short time while you heal from the eye surgery. Do not drive or operate machinery until your vision returns to normal.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • bleeding in the eye

  • eye pain

  • prolonged changes in vision

  • redness of the eye

  • sensitivity to light

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (Report these to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome.):

  • headache

  • swelling, pain, and inflammation of the eye

  • temporary changes in vision

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

This drug is given in a hospital or clinic and will not be stored at home.


Dexamethasone Ophthalmic drops, suspension

What is this medicine?

DEXAMETHASONE (dex a METH a sone) is a corticosteroid. It is used to treat swelling, redness, itching, and allergic reactions in the eye.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • any active infection

  • cataracts or glaucoma

  • contact lens wearer

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to dexamethasone, corticosteroids, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is only for use in the eye. Do not take by mouth. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Wash hands before and after use. Tilt your head back slightly and pull the lower eyelid away from the eye to form a pouch. Try not to touch the tip of the dropper to your eye, fingertips, or other surface. Squeeze the prescribed number of drops into the pouch. Close the eye for a few moments to spread the drops. Do not use more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, use it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, use only that dose. Do not use double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Interactions are not expected. Do not use any other eye products without asking your doctor or health care professional.

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Check with your doctor or health care professional if your condition does not start to get better, or if it gets worse. Check with your doctor or health care professional before using this medicine for any future eye problems. Tell your doctor or health care professional if you are exposed to anyone with measles or chickenpox, or if you develop sores or blisters that do not heal properly.

If you wear contact lenses, ask your doctor or health care professional when you can use your lenses again. If you can continue wearing your lenses during treatment, wait 15 minutes after application of the product before inserting your lenses.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • change in the amount of urine

  • changes in vision

  • fever, sore throat, sneezing, cough, or other signs of infection, wounds that will not heal

  • increased thirst

  • mental depression, mood swings, mistaken feelings of self importance or of being mistreated

  • pain in hips, back, ribs, arms, shoulders, or legs

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth

  • swelling of feet or lower legs

  • unusual bleeding or bruising

  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • headache

  • nausea, vomiting

  • skin problems, acne, thin and shiny skin

  • weight gain

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Do not freeze. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


Dexamethasone Oral solution

What is this medicine?

DEXAMETHASONE (dex a METH a sone) is a corticosteroid. It is commonly used to treat inflammation of the skin, joints, lungs, and other organs. Common conditions treated include asthma, allergies, and arthritis. It is also used for other conditions, like blood disorders and diseases of the adrenal glands.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • Cushing's syndrome

  • diabetes

  • glaucoma

  • heart problems or disease

  • high blood pressure

  • infection like herpes, measles, tuberculosis, or chickenpox

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • mental problems

  • myasthenia gravis

  • osteoporosis

  • previous heart attack

  • seizures

  • stomach, ulcer or intestine disease including colitis and diverticulitis

  • thyroid problem

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to dexamethasone, corticosteroids, other medicines, lactose, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a full glass of water. Use the dosing dispenser provided to measure your dose. You may mix the dose with a small amount of liquid or soft food like pudding. If you do, you should eat the food or drink the liquid containing the medicine right away. Do not store the diluted medicine for future use. Follow the directions on the prescription label. If you are only taking the medicine once a day, take it in the morning. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed. Do not suddenly stop taking your medicine because you may develop a severe reaction. Your doctor will tell you how much medicine to take. If your doctor wants you to stop the medicine, the dose will be slowly lowered over time to avoid any side effects.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for children as young as 1 month of age for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

Patients over 65 years old may have a stronger reaction and need a smaller dose.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • mifepristone, RU-486

  • vaccines

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • amphotericin B

  • antibiotics like clarithromycin, erythromycin, and troleandomycin

  • aspirin and aspirin-like drugs

  • barbiturates like phenobarbital

  • carbamazepine

  • cholestyramine

  • cholinesterase inhibitors like donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine, and tacrine

  • cyclosporine

  • digoxin

  • diuretics

  • ephedrine

  • female hormones, like estrogens or progestins and birth control pills

  • indinavir

  • isoniazid

  • ketoconazole

  • medicines for diabetes

  • medicines that improve muscle tone or strength for conditions like myasthenia gravis

  • NSAIDs, medicines for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen

  • phenytoin

  • rifampin

  • thalidomide

  • warfarin

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. If you are taking this medicine over a prolonged period, carry an identification card with your name and address, the type and dose of your medicine, and your doctor's name and address.

This medicine may increase your risk of getting an infection. Stay away from people who are sick. Tell your doctor or health care professional if you are around anyone with measles or chickenpox.

If you are going to have surgery, tell your doctor or health care professional that you have taken this medicine within the last twelve months.

Ask your doctor or health care professional about your diet. You may need to lower the amount of salt you eat.

The medicine can increase your blood sugar. If you are a diabetic check with your doctor if you need help adjusting the dose of your diabetic medicine.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • changes in vision

  • fever, sore throat, sneezing, cough, or other signs of infection, wounds that will not heal

  • increased thirst

  • mental depression, mood swings, mistaken feelings of self importance or of being mistreated

  • pain in hips, back, ribs, arms, shoulders, or legs

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth

  • swelling of feet or lower legs

  • trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine

  • unusual bleeding or bruising

  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • headache

  • nausea, vomiting

  • skin problems, acne, thin and shiny skin

  • weight gain

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 20 and 25 degrees C (68 and 77 degrees F). Protect from light. Throw away this medicine 90 days after opening the bottle or after the expiration date, whichever comes first. Do not use this medicine if it is not clear. The medicine should not have any flakes or particles in it.


Dexamethasone Oral tablet

What is this medicine?

DEXAMETHASONE (dex a METH a sone) is a corticosteroid. It is commonly used to treat inflammation of the skin, joints, lungs, and other organs. Common conditions treated include asthma, allergies, and arthritis. It is also used for other conditions, such as blood disorders and diseases of the adrenal glands.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • Cushing's syndrome

  • diabetes

  • glaucoma

  • heart problems or disease

  • high blood pressure

  • infection like herpes, measles, tuberculosis, or chickenpox

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • mental problems

  • myasthenia gravis

  • osteoporosis

  • previous heart attack

  • seizures

  • stomach, ulcer or intestine disease including colitis and diverticulitis

  • thyroid problem

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to dexamethasone, corticosteroids, other medicines, lactose, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth with a drink of water. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Take it with food or milk to avoid stomach upset. If you are taking this medicine once a day, take it in the morning. Do not take more medicine than you are told to take. Do not suddenly stop taking your medicine because you may develop a severe reaction. Your doctor will tell you how much medicine to take. If your doctor wants you to stop the medicine, the dose may be slowly lowered over time to avoid any side effects.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Patients over 65 years old may have a stronger reaction and need a smaller dose.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, talk to your doctor or health care professional. You may need to miss a dose or take an extra dose. Do not take double or extra doses without advice.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • mifepristone, RU-486

  • vaccines

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • amphotericin B

  • antibiotics like clarithromycin, erythromycin, and troleandomycin

  • aspirin and aspirin-like drugs

  • barbiturates like phenobarbital

  • carbamazepine

  • cholestyramine

  • cholinesterase inhibitors like donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine, and tacrine

  • cyclosporine

  • digoxin

  • diuretics

  • ephedrine

  • female hormones, like estrogens or progestins and birth control pills

  • indinavir

  • isoniazid

  • ketoconazole

  • medicines for diabetes

  • medicines that improve muscle tone or strength for conditions like myasthenia gravis

  • NSAIDs, medicines for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen

  • phenytoin

  • rifampin

  • thalidomide

  • warfarin

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. If you are taking this medicine over a prolonged period, carry an identification card with your name and address, the type and dose of your medicine, and your doctor's name and address.

This medicine may increase your risk of getting an infection. Stay away from people who are sick. Tell your doctor or health care professional if you are around anyone with measles or chickenpox.

If you are going to have surgery, tell your doctor or health care professional that you have taken this medicine within the last twelve months.

Ask your doctor or health care professional about your diet. You may need to lower the amount of salt you eat.

The medicine can increase your blood sugar. If you are a diabetic check with your doctor if you need help adjusting the dose of your diabetic medicine.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • changes in vision

  • fever, sore throat, sneezing, cough, or other signs of infection, wounds that will not heal

  • increased thirst

  • mental depression, mood swings, mistaken feelings of self importance or of being mistreated

  • pain in hips, back, ribs, arms, shoulders, or legs

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth

  • trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine

  • swelling of feet or lower legs

  • unusual bleeding or bruising

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • headache

  • nausea, vomiting

  • skin problems, acne, thin and shiny skin

  • weight gain

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 20 and 25 degrees C (68 and 77 degrees F). Protect from light. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Ophthalmic drops, solution

What is this medicine?

DEXAMETHASONE (dex a METH a sone) is a corticosteroid. It is used to treat swelling, redness, itching, and allergic reactions in the eye.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • any active infection

  • cataracts or glaucoma

  • contact lens wearer

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to dexamethasone, corticosteroids, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is only for use in the eye. Do not take by mouth. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Wash hands before and after use. Tilt your head back slightly and pull the lower eyelid away from the eye to form a pouch. Try not to touch the tip of the dropper to your eye, fingertips, or other surface. Squeeze the prescribed number of drops into the pouch. Close the eye for a few moments to spread the drops. Do not use more often than directed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, use it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, use only that dose. Do not use double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Interactions are not expected. Do not use any other eye products without asking your doctor or health care professional.

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Check with your doctor or health care professional if your condition does not start to get better, or if it gets worse. Check with your doctor or health care professional before using this medicine for any future eye problems. Tell your doctor or health care professional if you are exposed to anyone with measles or chickenpox, or if you develop sores or blisters that do not heal properly.

If you wear contact lenses, ask your doctor or health care professional when you can use your lenses again. If you can continue wearing your lenses during treatment, wait 15 minutes after application of the product before inserting your lenses.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • change in the amount of urine

  • changes in vision

  • fever, sore throat, sneezing, cough, or other signs of infection, wounds that will not heal

  • increased thirst

  • mental depression, mood swings, mistaken feelings of self importance or of being mistreated

  • pain in hips, back, ribs, arms, shoulders, or legs

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth

  • swelling of feet or lower legs

  • unusual bleeding or bruising

  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • headache

  • nausea, vomiting

  • skin problems, acne, thin and shiny skin

  • weight gain

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Do not freeze. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Ophthalmic ointment

What is this medicine?

DEXAMETHASONE (dex a METH a sone) is a corticosteroid. It is used to treat swelling, redness, itching, and allergic reactions in the eye.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • any type of active infection

  • cataracts

  • contact lens wearer

  • diabetes

  • glaucoma

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to dexamethasone, corticosteroids, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for use in the eye. Do not take by mouth. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Wash hands before and after use. Tilt your head back slightly, and pull the lower eyelid away from the eye to form a pouch. Squeeze a strip of the ointment (about 1/3-inch long) into the pouch and close your eye. Do not touch the eye or eyelid with the tip of the tube. Do not blink. Close the eye for a few moments to allow the medicine to be in contact with the eye. Do not use this medicine more often or for a longer period of time than prescribed.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, use it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, use only that dose. Do not use double or extra doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

Interactions are not expected. Do not use any other eye products without asking your doctor or health care professional.

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Check with your doctor or health care professional if your condition does not get better within 5 days, or if it gets worse. Check with your doctor or health care professional before using this medicine for any future eye problems. Tell your doctor or health care professional if you are exposed to anyone with measles or chickenpox, or if you develop sores or blisters that do not heal properly.

If you wear contact lenses, ask your doctor or health care professional when you can use your lenses again.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • changes in vision

  • eye pain

  • infection

  • nausea, vomiting

  • watery eyes

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • burning, redness or stinging in the eye

  • temporary watering or blurring of vision

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Do not freeze. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.


Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate Solution for injection

What is this medicine?

DEXAMETHASONE (dex a METH a sone) is a corticosteroid. It is used to treat inflammation of the skin, joints, lungs, and other organs. Common conditions treated include asthma, allergies, and arthritis. It is also used for other conditions, like blood disorders and diseases of the adrenal glands.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • blood clotting problems

  • Cushing's syndrome

  • diabetes

  • glaucoma

  • heart problems or disease

  • high blood pressure

  • infection like herpes, measles, tuberculosis, or chickenpox

  • kidney disease

  • liver disease

  • mental problems

  • myasthenia gravis

  • osteoporosis

  • previous heart attack

  • seizures

  • stomach, ulcer or intestine disease including colitis and diverticulitis

  • thyroid problem

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to dexamethasone, corticosteroids, other medicines, lactose, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for injection into a muscle, joint, lesion, soft tissue, or vein. It is given by a health care professional in a hospital or clinic setting.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

This may not apply. If you are having a series of injections over a prolonged period, try not to miss an appointment. Call your doctor or health care professional to reschedule if you are unable to keep an appointment.

What may interact with this medicine?

Do not take this medicine with any of the following medications:

  • mifepristone, RU-486

  • vaccines

This medicine may also interact with the following medications:

  • amphotericin B

  • antibiotics like clarithromycin, erythromycin, and troleandomycin

  • aspirin and aspirin-like drugs

  • barbiturates like phenobarbital

  • carbamazepine

  • cholestyramine

  • cholinesterase inhibitors like donepezil, galantamine, rivastigmine, and tacrine

  • cyclosporine

  • digoxin

  • diuretics

  • ephedrine

  • female hormones, like estrogens or progestins and birth control pills

  • indinavir

  • isoniazid

  • ketoconazole

  • medicines for diabetes

  • medicines that improve muscle tone or strength for conditions like myasthenia gravis

  • NSAIDs, medicines for pain and inflammation, like ibuprofen or naproxen

  • phenytoin

  • rifampin

  • thalidomide

  • warfarin

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Your condition will be monitored carefully while you are receiving this medicine.

If you are taking this medicine for a long time, carry an identification card with your name and address, the type and dose of your medicine, and your doctor's name and address.

This medicine may increase your risk of getting an infection. Stay away from people who are sick. Tell your doctor or health care professional if you are around anyone with measles or chickenpox. Talk to your health care provider before you get any vaccines that you take this medicine.

If you are going to have surgery, tell your doctor or health care professional that you have taken this medicine within the last twelve months.

Ask your doctor or health care professional about your diet. You may need to lower the amount of salt you eat.

The medicine can increase your blood sugar. If you are a diabetic check with your doctor if you need help adjusting the dose of your diabetic medicine.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • black or tarry stools

  • change in the amount of urine

  • changes in vision

  • confusion, excitement, restlessness, a false sense of well-being

  • fever, sore throat, sneezing, cough, or other signs of infection, wounds that will not heal

  • hallucinations

  • increased thirst

  • mental depression, mood swings, mistaken feelings of self importance or of being mistreated

  • pain in hips, back, ribs, arms, shoulders, or legs

  • pain, redness, or irritation at the injection site

  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth

  • rounding out of face

  • swelling of feet or lower legs

  • unusual bleeding or bruising

  • unusual tired or weak

  • wounds that do not heal

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • diarrhea or constipation

  • change in taste

  • headache

  • nausea, vomiting

  • skin problems, acne, thin and shiny skin

  • touble sleeping

  • unusual growth of hair on the face or body

  • weight gain

This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medicine?

This drug is given in a hospital or clinic and will not be stored at home.


 
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