Dr. Gregory Spana

Poised to battle prostate cancer

Monday, July 2, 2018 |

When it comes to cancer treatment at Bayhealth, we take an interdisciplinary approach — meaning our medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, surgeons, and other specialists work together to customize a treatment plan for each patient that addresses his or her individual needs. As a member of the Penn Cancer Network, we also provide genetic testing and counseling as appropriate, which further guides the development of the patient’s personalized treatment plan.

APPROXIMATELY 11.2% OF MEN WILL BE DIAGNOSED WITH PROSTATE CANCER AT SOME POINT DURING THEIR LIFETIME, BASED ON 2013-2015 DATA. — NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE

Bayhealth’s Genitourinary Tumor Conference offers six primary options as part of this interdisciplinary approach to prostate cancer treatment. Urologist and Conference co-chair Gregory Spana, MD explains them:

Active surveillance 

This treatment approach is for patients with low-risk prostate cancer. It entails regularly checking the patient’s prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels to monitor changes. If there are changes, this may require modifying the patient’s prostate cancer treatment plan.

Surgery

Radical prostatectomy is a procedure in which the prostate is laparoscopically removed with the assistance of a surgical robot. It involves minimal, small incisions, and the surgery takes an hour and a half to three hours to complete. Patients typically stay in the hospital overnight and go home the next day, and most return to normal activity within two to three weeks.

Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy is a noninvasive treatment for prostate cancer. A specific type of radiation therapy is Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy or IMRT. This form of radiation therapy is delivered externally and precisely using image guidance to the prostate (typically taking less than 15 minutes), daily for approximately eight weeks.

Cryotherapy

This prostate cancer treatment is done at the hospital as an outpatient procedure. It involves placing needles through the skin into the prostate to freeze the cancer. The procedure typically takes about an hour and a half.

Hormone therapy

This treatment is for patients who have cancer that has spread outside of the prostate. It is administered as an intramuscular shot that slows the progression of the cancer. It is often followed by chemotherapy.

Chemotherapy

This involves certified and trained chemotherapy nurses (RNs) delivering intravenous drug therapy through infusion in a series of treatments.

Visit Bayhealth's Cancer Services page to learn more about cancer care at Bayhealth.